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  Frequently Asked Questions  

  1. What is the recommended amount of seed to put in the Sproutmaster?
  2. Does it matter what type of water you use to soak and rinse the seeds?
  3. How long should I soak the seeds?
  4. Do you soak the seed in the Sproutmaster?
  5. Why are some seeds hard?
  6. Is it normal for some seeds to have a fuzzy moldy appearance?
  7. How long should I grow the seeds?
  8. Why should I have a supply of sprouting seeds in my food storage?
  9. What is the shelf life of the seeds?
  10. How do I clean the Sproutmaster?
  11. Can you get Salmonella or E-coli from sprouts?
  12. What part of the sprout do I eat?
  13. How do I get the outside coating picked off the seeds?

1. What is the recommended amount of seed to put in the Sproutmaster?

For tiny seeds like alfalfa, you only need 4 tsp. for the mini tray and 4 Tb. for the large tray. These seeds take 4 days to grow tall, so you start with a small amount of seed to allow room for expansion.

Larger seeds like the Pro-Vita-Mix, which is ready to eat in 1 ½ days, will not expand as much as the smaller seeds, so you can put up to ½ cup in the mini tray and 2 cups in the large tray. Since the trays have a divider, you can do a half tray of two different kinds.

2. Does it matter what type of water you use to soak and rinse the seeds?

The sprouts will grow with any type of water they are given. However, they will also take in the properties of that water. If your water has a lot of chemicals in it, the sprouts will take them in and you will get them also. Use as pure water as you would like to drink.

3. How long should I soak the seeds?

Some seeds can be soaked for only 4 to 6 hours. However, to make it easier and to make sure any hard seed is given a chance to soak up the water for softening, we recommend soaking most seeds 12 hours or over night.

4. Do you soak the seed in the Sproutmaster?

No. The Sproutmaster has a complete grid system of holes in the bottom to release all the water. You will need to use a separate dish, bottle, or cup with enough capacity for the seeds to expand 3-4 times their original volume. Do not cover this container or they could sour.

5. Why are some seeds hard?

During the growing process, some seeds may develop as different rates. Often, hard seed indicated the presence of some immature seeds.

6. Is it normal for some seeds to have a fuzzy moldy appearance?

There some seeds, typically radish, which produce tiny root hairs on the stem on the third day. They are so small and close together that they often are mistaken for fuzzy mold. Carefully look at “fuzzy” sprouts before throwing them away to make sure they are not just seed root hairs. You should not get mold unless you are not rinsing the sprouts 2 times a day.

Mold spreads over, among, and above several plants. You may have to use a magnifying glass until you can distinguish the difference. If you do encounter mold, it could be caused by one of the following: 1) Lack of daily rinsing. 2) Too much moisture. In times of high humidity, only rinse once per day. 3) May need more air. Leave lid off and cover with dry hand towel.

7. How long should I grow the seeds?

Grow to taste. Usually the large seeds are best a 1-½ days and the small seeds can be grown for 3 to 5 days.

Some people think all sprouts have to grow for 4 to 5 days and get long stems and leaves. Alfalfa, clover, cabbage, radish, broccoli, buckwheat, and sunflower greens are generally the sprouts you would grow tall and then let them develop the chlorophyll for a few hours the last day of sprouting. If the roots turn a brownish color or are too long they can be pinched off before eating the ‘baby plants’.

The bigger seeds such as Mung beans, Lentils, Adzuki beans, sunflower, peas, wheat, and Pro-Vita-Mix are the best flavor when grown 1-½ to 2 days. At this point grains, beans, and legumes only have a white sprout tail ¼ to ½ inch long. They will be milder in flavor, more tender, and free of a lot of roots, if grown for couple days. Since these sprouts continue to grow at a slow rate in the refrigerator, it is best to refrigerate them before they are very mature.

8. Why should I have a supply of sprouting seeds in my food storage?

The sprouts are a great source of natural vitamin C, calcium, and all your minerals, vitamins, and proteins. How else could you have fresh greens and fresh, healthy food in 1 to 4 days if other sources were not available?

9. What is the shelf life of the seeds?

Some are good for 3 to 5 years (usually vegetable seed); others can keep for 15 to 20 years.

10. How do I clean the Sproutmaster?

You can clean the sprouter with a toothbrush or other kitchen brush. If stains occur, brush with baking soda or soak a few minutes in dilute Clorox water.

11. Can you get Salmonella or E-coli from sprouts?

These organisms come from meat sources. Wash hands and cooking surfaces well after touching or cutting meat and you will not get a cross contamination to your sprouts.

12. What part of the sprout do I eat?

Eat all of it. The seed plus the white sprout tail. If you have long or discolored roots on some of your longer growing sprouts (buckwheat and sunflower greens), they can be pinched off before eating them.

13. How do I get the outside coating picked off the seeds?

Don’t worry about the hulls, they provide added fiber. An exception would be the shells on whole buckwheat and whole sunflower seeds, because they are too tough to eat. When these seeds are fully sprouted, they will pop their shells off and they will fall down to the bottom of the tray or they can be easily picked off.

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